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 ➳ CLASSIC TELEVISION SHOWS
SuperCowboy62's Channel
SuperCowboy62's Channel
 ➳ CLASSIC TELEVISION SHOWS
SuperCowboy62's Channel

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BEVHILLXMAS02
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SuperCowboy62
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➳ CLASSIC TELEVISION SHOWS
Name: SuperCowboy62

Channel Views: 11,177

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Welcome, I will be putting up a few old TV shows time to time, mostly Premier Episodes of past old TV shows. I will try and be by a few times a week. Enjoy!

Television first became commercialized in the U.S. in the early 1950s, initially by RCA (through NBC, which it owned) and CBS. A number of different broadcast systems had been developed through the end of the 1930s. The National Television System Committee (NTSC) standardized on a 525-line broadcast in 1941 that would provide the basis for TV across the country through the end of the century. Television development halted with the onset of World War II, but pioneers returned to the airwaves when that conflict ended.

Western films often depict conflicts with Native Americans. While early Eurocentric Westerns frequently portray the ”Injuns” as dishonorable villains, the later and more culturally neutral Westerns (notably those directed by John Ford) gave native Americans a more sympathetic treatment. Other recurring themes of Westerns include Western treks or perilous journeys (e.g. Stagecoach) or groups of bandits terrorising small towns such as in The Magnificent Seven.

Early Westerns were mostly filmed in the studio, just like other early Hollywood films, but when location shooting became more common from the 1930s, producers of Westerns used desolate corners of Arizona, California, Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, or Wyoming. Productions were also filmed on location at movie ranches.

Often, the vast landscape becomes more than a vivid backdrop; it becomes a character in the film. After the early 1950s, various wide screen formats such as cinemascope (1953) and VistaVision used the expanded width of the screen to display spectacular Western landscapes. John Ford’s use of Monument Valley as an expressive landscape in his films from Stagecoach (1939) to Cheyenne Autumn (1965) ”present us with a mythic vision of the plains and deserts of the American West, embodied most memorably in Monument Valley, with its buttes and mesas that tower above the men on horseback, whether they be settlers, soldiers, or Native Americans.”

Member Since
07-01-2013
Male
1 Likes
First Name
RAY
About Me
⚑ The link below features all TV series now on DVD, and any other past series currently going to DVD.
Country
 United States
Favorite Movies & Shows
Classic TV Shows
SuperCowboy62
Member
Flag This User — cancel
Select the category that most closely reflects your concerns so we can review it and determine if it violates the Society Guidelines
➳ CLASSIC TELEVISION SHOWS
Name: SuperCowboy62

Channel Views: 11,177

Upload Views: 228,865

Subscribers: 25

User: Offline


Welcome, I will be putting up a few old TV shows time to time, mostly Premier Episodes of past old TV shows. I will try and be by a few times a week. Enjoy!

Television first became commercialized in the U.S. in the early 1950s, initially by RCA (through NBC, which it owned) and CBS. A number of different broadcast systems had been developed through the end of the 1930s. The National Television System Committee (NTSC) standardized on a 525-line broadcast in 1941 that would provide the basis for TV across the country through the end of the century. Television development halted with the onset of World War II, but pioneers returned to the airwaves when that conflict ended.

Western films often depict conflicts with Native Americans. While early Eurocentric Westerns frequently portray the ”Injuns” as dishonorable villains, the later and more culturally neutral Westerns (notably those directed by John Ford) gave native Americans a more sympathetic treatment. Other recurring themes of Westerns include Western treks or perilous journeys (e.g. Stagecoach) or groups of bandits terrorising small towns such as in The Magnificent Seven.

Early Westerns were mostly filmed in the studio, just like other early Hollywood films, but when location shooting became more common from the 1930s, producers of Westerns used desolate corners of Arizona, California, Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, or Wyoming. Productions were also filmed on location at movie ranches.

Often, the vast landscape becomes more than a vivid backdrop; it becomes a character in the film. After the early 1950s, various wide screen formats such as cinemascope (1953) and VistaVision used the expanded width of the screen to display spectacular Western landscapes. John Ford’s use of Monument Valley as an expressive landscape in his films from Stagecoach (1939) to Cheyenne Autumn (1965) ”present us with a mythic vision of the plains and deserts of the American West, embodied most memorably in Monument Valley, with its buttes and mesas that tower above the men on horseback, whether they be settlers, soldiers, or Native Americans.”

Member Since
07-01-2013
Male
1 Likes
First Name
RAY
About Me
⚑ The link below features all TV series now on DVD, and any other past series currently going to DVD.
Country
 United States
Favorite Movies & Shows
Classic TV Shows
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