the kinks - days - stereo edit
the kinks - days - stereo edit
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Description
edit for headphones. source file is from the album "are the village green preservation society" (2004 special deluxe 3 cd edition)(cd 1 song # 17).

Jim Beviglia wrote: (...) No experience is as familiar or emotional as bidding farewell to someone you love, which may be why “Days,” a 1968 single by The Kinks that only reached #12 on the U.K. pop charts and didn’t even make the charts in the U.S., is so eternally resonant. Ray Davies’ wistful musings in the song work whether a friend is moving away, a romantic relationship has run its course, or a beloved person has passed away.

Davies himself understands the almost supernatural power the song possesses, confessing in a YouTube clip promoting his 2010 album See My Friends that even he didn’t anticipate what “Days” would eventually mean to people. “The song has grown in intensity over the years,” he said. “I didn’t think much about the song when I wrote it. Sometimes songs occur like that. You don’t think about it, but it’s built up quite a lot of mystique over the years. It certainly left me. It belongs to the world now.”

The song was originally written to be a part of The Kinks’ 1968 concept album The Kinks Are The Village Green Preservation Society, but was rushed out by the record company as a single. “Days” indeed has the feeling of a song that belongs to a larger story, since Davies doesn’t really set the scene or say what happened that caused this person to leave; he just gets right to gratitude: “Thank you for the days / Those endless days, those sacred days you gave me.”

As it turns out, the days for which the narrator nostalgically pines weren’t endless after all, since the person he’s thanking is no longer with him. “I bless the light that lights on you, believe me,” Davies sings above a kicking backbeat that never lets things get too melancholy. “And though you’re gone / You’re with me every single day, believe me.”

In the bridge, the sunny outlook to which this guy clings in the face of his heartbreak starts to crack. “I wish today could be tomorrow,” Davies sings. “The night is dark / It just brings sorrow, anyway.” He realizes that the finest moments in life are fleeting and that this relationship was one of his finest moments: “You took my life / But then I knew that very soon you’d leave me.” In the end, the benefits of their time together far outweigh the sadness caused by the parting of the ways:
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Entertainment, Music
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Views: 652
Uploaded: 3 years ago
Duration: 02:59
Rate this video
Rating: 5/5 ~ Votes: 1
Videos: 577
Subscribers: 29
Description
edit for headphones. source file is from the album "are the village green preservation society" (2004 special deluxe 3 cd edition)(cd 1 song # 17).

Jim Beviglia wrote: (...) No experience is as familiar or emotional as bidding farewell to someone you love, which may be why “Days,” a 1968 single by The Kinks that only reached #12 on the U.K. pop charts and didn’t even make the charts in the U.S., is so eternally resonant. Ray Davies’ wistful musings in the song work whether a friend is moving away, a romantic relationship has run its course, or a beloved person has passed away.

Davies himself understands the almost supernatural power the song possesses, confessing in a YouTube clip promoting his 2010 album See My Friends that even he didn’t anticipate what “Days” would eventually mean to people. “The song has grown in intensity over the years,” he said. “I didn’t think much about the song when I wrote it. Sometimes songs occur like that. You don’t think about it, but it’s built up quite a lot of mystique over the years. It certainly left me. It belongs to the world now.”

The song was originally written to be a part of The Kinks’ 1968 concept album The Kinks Are The Village Green Preservation Society, but was rushed out by the record company as a single. “Days” indeed has the feeling of a song that belongs to a larger story, since Davies doesn’t really set the scene or say what happened that caused this person to leave; he just gets right to gratitude: “Thank you for the days / Those endless days, those sacred days you gave me.”

As it turns out, the days for which the narrator nostalgically pines weren’t endless after all, since the person he’s thanking is no longer with him. “I bless the light that lights on you, believe me,” Davies sings above a kicking backbeat that never lets things get too melancholy. “And though you’re gone / You’re with me every single day, believe me.”

In the bridge, the sunny outlook to which this guy clings in the face of his heartbreak starts to crack. “I wish today could be tomorrow,” Davies sings. “The night is dark / It just brings sorrow, anyway.” He realizes that the finest moments in life are fleeting and that this relationship was one of his finest moments: “You took my life / But then I knew that very soon you’d leave me.” In the end, the benefits of their time together far outweigh the sadness caused by the parting of the ways:
Category
Entertainment, Music
Autoplay: No Yes