Popular Mechanic Future Cars 1948
Popular Mechanic Future Cars 1948
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Uploaded: 6 months ago
Duration: 02:15
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Description
'Popular Mechanics showcases three futuristic cars that introduced innovations in design and technology that were well ahead of their time. Truly streamlined marvels on wheels! First we see the "Davis 3-Wheeler", powered by a 47 hp Hercules 4-cylinder engine coupled to a Borg-Warner 3-speed transmission and Spicer rear end. The tiny car featured four-across seating, and even included built in hydraulic jacks to assist with changing tires. Next we see a rivited aluminum bodied streamlined car that looks very much like an aircraft of the period. Last is a TASCO prototype car built by Gordon Buehrig, a well known designer of cars for Packard, General Motors, Stutz, Cord, Duesenberg, and Ford. The design borrowed many ideas from airplanes at the time and was constructed with an aluminum & plastic body, cast magnesium wheels that were fully enclosed in their own fairings with the front two made from fiberglass which turned with the wheels.'

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Views: 166
Uploaded: 6 months ago
Duration: 02:15
Rate this video
Rating: 5/5 ~ Votes: 2
Videos: 967
Subscribers: 84
Description
'Popular Mechanics showcases three futuristic cars that introduced innovations in design and technology that were well ahead of their time. Truly streamlined marvels on wheels! First we see the "Davis 3-Wheeler", powered by a 47 hp Hercules 4-cylinder engine coupled to a Borg-Warner 3-speed transmission and Spicer rear end. The tiny car featured four-across seating, and even included built in hydraulic jacks to assist with changing tires. Next we see a rivited aluminum bodied streamlined car that looks very much like an aircraft of the period. Last is a TASCO prototype car built by Gordon Buehrig, a well known designer of cars for Packard, General Motors, Stutz, Cord, Duesenberg, and Ford. The design borrowed many ideas from airplanes at the time and was constructed with an aluminum & plastic body, cast magnesium wheels that were fully enclosed in their own fairings with the front two made from fiberglass which turned with the wheels.'