NASA’s Mars 2020 Supersonic Parachute - Test Flight #1 - HD
NASA’s Mars 2020 Supersonic Parachute - Test Flight #1 - HD
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Uploaded: 6 months ago
Duration: 02:37
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Description
The first flight of an advanced supersonic parachute system for Mars 2020—NASA’s next Mars rover. This video is narrated by Ian Clark, the test's technical lead from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The test took place on Oct. 4, 2017, at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia. At the moment of full inflation, the parachute is going 1.8 times the speed of sound or nearly 1,300 miles an hour, and generating nearly 35,000 pounds of drag force—drag that would be necessary to help slow a payload down as it was entering the Martian atmosphere. This is the first of several tests in support of NASA’s Mars 2020 mission. For more information, visit https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020 .

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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Views: 171
Uploaded: 6 months ago
Duration: 02:37
0 Likes, 0 Dislikes
Videos: 933
Subscribers: 51
Description
The first flight of an advanced supersonic parachute system for Mars 2020—NASA’s next Mars rover. This video is narrated by Ian Clark, the test's technical lead from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The test took place on Oct. 4, 2017, at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia. At the moment of full inflation, the parachute is going 1.8 times the speed of sound or nearly 1,300 miles an hour, and generating nearly 35,000 pounds of drag force—drag that would be necessary to help slow a payload down as it was entering the Martian atmosphere. This is the first of several tests in support of NASA’s Mars 2020 mission. For more information, visit https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020 .

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech