"Hey There Delilah Guitar Instrumental"
"Hey There Delilah Guitar Instrumental"
Videos: 13
Subscribers: 24
Views: 968
Uploaded: 8 years ago
Duration: 05:02
Videos: 13
Subscribers: 24
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Description
"HEY THERE DELILAH" - ACOUSTIC GUITAR COVER
RECORDED AT STUDIOROCK OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
ARRANGEMENT BY MARK JEFFERY CAMPAYNO
ORIGINAL BY TOM HIGGENSON (PLAIN WHITE T’S)

The Process:
The song "Hey There Delilah", written by Tom Higgenson, was a gigantic hit. It’s very simple opening chord progression (I-iii) one major to minor three in D Major, was very effective. It’s very sparse accompaniment along with it’s lyrically descriptive textural structure enabled the song to become an instant hit.

"Hey There Delilah" is a great example of a song that has overcome the dreaded "U Curve" that plagues practically all popular music. The U Curve occurs when a song is released and it’s popularity increases so quickly that its ability to maintain the publics focus for very long becomes degraded. Eventually the song declines as overexposure and familiarity erode its once promising beginning. However, quality songs usually return slowly to the public’s ear and stay entering the "classic song" library. "Hey There Delilla" has begun the long road back.

As a pop classic my take on this song was to reproduce the melody in different voices and alter it slightly. I’ve done that just enough to give it a different vibe while maintaining what I think is the most important characteristics of Higgenson’s work. I enjoy applying this process this to well-known songs so as not to replicate what has already been done.

I altered the melody right away so as to serve notice that this version of would be different. I managed to get most of the parts in my arrangement altered slightly, or some even more than slightly. Overall it’s a three guitar work that ended up being a lot of work to put together...the most work I’ve had to do in a long time

I was tempted to add drums bass and keyboards but refrained at the last minute so as to keep the piece as stark as the original. The accompaniment part differs from the original and in fact, the most signature part of the piece doesn’t appear at all in my version! The bass movement does appear occasionally, which I find one of the strongest parts of the original. The song is diatonic to the key of D major and stays there for the duration. I kept the original key by capoing the guitars on the second fret so as to play chords that fit into the key of C (C, Em, Am, F, G). The reason being was to produce more open strings with which to create what I f

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Views: 968
Uploaded: 8 years ago
Duration: 05:02
Videos: 13
Subscribers: 24
Description
"HEY THERE DELILAH" - ACOUSTIC GUITAR COVER
RECORDED AT STUDIOROCK OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
ARRANGEMENT BY MARK JEFFERY CAMPAYNO
ORIGINAL BY TOM HIGGENSON (PLAIN WHITE T’S)

The Process:
The song "Hey There Delilah", written by Tom Higgenson, was a gigantic hit. It’s very simple opening chord progression (I-iii) one major to minor three in D Major, was very effective. It’s very sparse accompaniment along with it’s lyrically descriptive textural structure enabled the song to become an instant hit.

"Hey There Delilah" is a great example of a song that has overcome the dreaded "U Curve" that plagues practically all popular music. The U Curve occurs when a song is released and it’s popularity increases so quickly that its ability to maintain the publics focus for very long becomes degraded. Eventually the song declines as overexposure and familiarity erode its once promising beginning. However, quality songs usually return slowly to the public’s ear and stay entering the "classic song" library. "Hey There Delilla" has begun the long road back.

As a pop classic my take on this song was to reproduce the melody in different voices and alter it slightly. I’ve done that just enough to give it a different vibe while maintaining what I think is the most important characteristics of Higgenson’s work. I enjoy applying this process this to well-known songs so as not to replicate what has already been done.

I altered the melody right away so as to serve notice that this version of would be different. I managed to get most of the parts in my arrangement altered slightly, or some even more than slightly. Overall it’s a three guitar work that ended up being a lot of work to put together...the most work I’ve had to do in a long time

I was tempted to add drums bass and keyboards but refrained at the last minute so as to keep the piece as stark as the original. The accompaniment part differs from the original and in fact, the most signature part of the piece doesn’t appear at all in my version! The bass movement does appear occasionally, which I find one of the strongest parts of the original. The song is diatonic to the key of D major and stays there for the duration. I kept the original key by capoing the guitars on the second fret so as to play chords that fit into the key of C (C, Em, Am, F, G). The reason being was to produce more open strings with which to create what I f